Friday, August 26, 2016

Jennifer DiBrienza, Ph.D. (WSC '93, STEINHARDT '94) on STEM Programs and the Future of Education


A former classroom teacher, Jennifer DiBrienza has worked as an education consultant with school districts across the country and internationally since 2001. She shared with us her experiences as an educator and the importance of teaching students to be ready for the unknown.

What did you study at NYU?

I thought I was going to go into Social Work but I found myself interested in Psychology. When I started thinking about becoming a teacher, Psychology seemed like a really good fit.

What's your favorite memory of NYU?

Meeting Ruth Bader Ginsberg and Joe DiMaggio before commencement!

What drew you to education?

I always loved math and I was aware of the general attitude of Americans (adults and children) that you are either a "math person" or you aren't. I decided to go into education with the hope of dispelling that myth.

Monday, July 11, 2016

Karissa Royster (CAS ’16) on her Broadway Debut with "Shuffle Along or the Making of the Musical Sensation of 1921 and All That Followed"


Can you tell us about your experience as a student at NYU?
 

I was in the Liberal Studies program for my first two years at NYU. I wanted to focus on either international relations or politics, and I ended up majoring in history with a minor in politics. I thought the program was great, and I have been considering going to graduate school to continue studying history.

When did you start dancing?

I have been dancing since my mom enrolled me in classes when I was three. We used to live in Colorado Springs and I originally started out doing figure skating. When my dad retired from the military, we moved to Texas, and I started focusing more on dance. I found a great tap teacher when I was twelve who had a youth ensemble that I joined.

When I moved to New York to attend NYU I continued taking tap classes at local studios with teachers like Derick Grant, cast member of Bring in 'Da Noise, Bring in 'Da Funk. On Mondays, I regularly performed at Swing Dance Night at the Cotton Club in Harlem with Dormeshia Sumbry-Edwards, who is an award-winning choreographer and tap dancer.

Friday, May 27, 2016

Gillian McCain (GSAS '90) reflects on NYU and her Artistic Passions

We recently chatted with Gillian McCain, author of two poetry books, Tilt and Religion, co-author (with Legs McNeil) of Please Kill Me: The Uncensored Oral History of Punk, and co-editor of Dear Nobody: The True Diary of Mary Rose (also with Legs McNeil). She is also a collector and exhibitor of found photography. She spoke about her time at NYU and her eclectic artistic pursuits.
Photo Credit: Annie Watts

Do you have a favorite NYU memory?

My friend Eric Swenson and I organized a reading by Gregory Corso at the Loeb Student Center—we got a thousand people there! It was crazy. It was free, but it was still crazy. We made flyers and went to the park all the time and gave them out. We were hanging out at this rare bookstore in the West Village, and that’s where we met Gregory Corso and the some of the other Beat writers; so they told some of their friends, and it was advertised well at NYU. They were paying Corso a thousand bucks, which was pretty significant at the time. It was an exciting event. And all the friends I made are still my best friends. I met my friend Chris Simunek first day of Expository Writing class—and he is still my one of my best friends. Up until recently he was the editor at High Times. I remember I’d hang out in Washington Square Park a lot and I remember there was this girl about my age, Corene LeMaitre, she just goes: “Nice boots.” And I go: “I like your boots, too.” And she is still a friend of mine. She ended up writing a novel for HarperCollins. So everyone did pretty well. A lot of people I have lost touch with, but I should look them up on Facebook.

Friday, May 13, 2016

Helen Arteaga (CAS ’99) Alumni Mentor and Stephanie Stanley (CAS ’18) Student Mentee on the CAS Alumni Mentorship Program

“The energy they give back to you is amazing!” - Helen Arteaga (CAS ’99)

Can you tell us about your experience acting as a mentor this semester?

I loved my mentee! Mentoring Stephanie reminded me that I can still do so much more. As we get older, and set in our careers and caught up in projects, we can forget that. Her energy reminded me that there are still more possibilities out there.

What advice did you give your student mentee?

I advised Stephanie to articulate in ten words or less what she wanted to do, and to match her research and internship project to her end goal. I also told her that there is no such thing as a straight path in your career. If you are not having U-turns, then you are not analyzing if you are on the right path professionally. I have had a lot of U-turns in my life and I used those opportunities to help me achieve what I set out to do.